La création plastique et le tournant ethnologique en Haïti

The advent of naive art to Haiti in the 1940s upset the «world of plastic language» there. Naive art arose at an «ethnological turning point» and emerged as one of its multiple fecundations. An analysis brings to light two facts. For one thing, the aesthetic judgement that established this new artistic genre in the country did not proceed from the native aesthetics advocated by the Haitian school of ethnology. For another, this school had a difficult time keeping abreast of this genre, thinking about it or even approaching it. Two distinct phenomena were happening within a single framework that made it easy to establish a «kinship» between the two, especially since ethnology proposed a global view of society that served as the basis for working out and justifying explanations of the artistic phenomenon. Haitian «discourse» about art referred to this basis with its strong and weak points.

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Why the cocks trade: what a transnational art market can reveal about cross-border relations

In the streets of Santo Domingo, Haitian and Dominican paintings are sold side-by-side, usually by Haitian dealers attracted to their neighbour’s much larger tourist market. They are easy to tell apart, for the Haitian paintings generally conform to the naïf style, whereas the Dominican paintings feature rural scenes or Taïno designs. The cultural differences in the designs of the paintings, and their appeal to foreign tourists rather than Dominicans, lend support to decades of scholarship describing Dominican–Haitian relations as being built upon nationalism and notions of racial difference, as well as the ‘exotic’ appeal that the Caribbean holds for tourists. However, this scholarship falls short of providing a holistic account of Dominican–Haitian relations because it sidelines the crucially important role of trade – historically and contemporaneously – in structuring them. In this article, I reinterpret the history and contemporary nature of art markets in Hispaniola to argue that market relations should be considered alongside symbolic representations when assessing transnational identity politics.

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Looking Like People; Feeling Like People: The Black Body, Dress and Aesthetic Therapy in the Caribbean

In the Caribbean, the practice of getting dressed matters because it is a practice of attending to the body. Under a colonial regime, black bodies were ill-treated and selves were negated. Clothing played an instrumental role in the abuse of bodies and the stripping of a sense of wellbeing. Attire was one key way of demarcating master and slave and rendering some members of society null and void.

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Counternarratives of the Diaspora: Haitian Musical Performance in World Beat Markets

This study will investigate the performance motivations of three Haitian musicians based in South Florida who use their artistic platforms to offer a version of their country omitted from dominant media projections of the country. This study focuses on narrative as a device that allows these musicians to offer counterstories against dominantly negative media projections that have real effects on Haitians.

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The Haiti Handicrafts Value Chain sustainable strategies for development

A Market-Driven, Value-Chain Approach to Economic Development & Poverty Reduction based on: USAID Global Market Assessment for Handicrafts; USAID Haitian Handicraft Value Chain Analysis ; Haitian handicraft development projects; First-hand market experience.

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Haitian Handicraft Value Chain Analysis

Haiti is known throughout the Caribbean, Americas and Europe for the quality and creativity of its handicrafts, especially metalwork. The capacity of the handicrafts industry to turn that advantage into a larger and growing market share is constrained by a number of factors. The objective of this assessment is to better understand the constraints and opportunities of the handicrafts industry in Haiti, and to present the findings to key stakeholders in the industry in order to develop a competitiveness strategy focused on greater efficiency, increased differentiation (including quality improvements) and accessing new markets.

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Caribbean Prehistoric Domestic Architecture: A Study of Spatio-Temporal Dynamics and Acculturation

The study of settlement geography, demography and social behavior in the prehistoric Carib and Taino societies of the Caribbean has recently become a prominent domain of interest to archaeologists working in these islands. Archaeological floor plans for prehistoric houses within the islands of St. Eustatius, Barbados, St. Thomas, Cuba and Puerto Rico demonstrate the cultural continuity of house shape, settlement organization and social organization from the early Saladoid to the contact period.

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