Mothers’ Religious Influence on Children Experiencing Trauma: Haiti Community Clinic Focus Groups

An earthquake measuring 7.0 on the Richter scale hit Haiti on January 10th, 2010. The earthquake, an urgent crisis, occurred in the context of persistent social dysfunctions, amplifying both the…

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Measuring Christian-Voodoo Syncretism in some Haitian Christian Churches in the North of Haiti

This study created a method for measuring the presence of Christian-voodoo syncretism in three Protestant denominations in the north of Haiti. Estimates of voodoo practice among Christians have ranged from…

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More Than a Misunderstood Religion: Rediscovering Vodou as a Tool of Survival and a Vehicle for Independence in Colonial Haiti.

The majority of Americans today closely associate the term “Voodoo” with satanism, witchcraft and barbaric sacrifice. Yet, far from these ill­formed depictions and misconceptions— which first took root through the…

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Mambos, priestesses, and goddesses: spiritual healing through Vodou in black women’s narratives of Haiti and New Orleans

In Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History, Michel-Rolph Trouillot contextualizes silence as “an active and transitive process” (48) in the production of historical narratives. His examination of the Haitian Revolution (1791- 1804) reveals how silences are inevitably and oftentimes, consciously written into historical narratives; thus, changing the meaning of past events and what counts as official history. The events that transpired in what was to become the largest slave revolt in the Western Hemisphere were initially interpreted by the French government and intelligentsia as minor infractions; by eighteenth-century standards, according to Trouillot, a large-scale revolt was thought impossible for blacks to conceive.

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